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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,173 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that is drowns in yemen despite the obama administration's rhetoric to disrupt, dismantle and defeat al qaeda, that it's not drowns or airstrikes that are driving. it is civilian casualties. it's the individuals being killed along with the al qaeda targets. when i was in yemen, i was talking to someone who's very, very close to al qaeda he said look, you know, there's a difference between yemen and afghanistan and yemen and afghanistan are arabs and a knock at the country. in yemen archenemies in yemen. they move around much easier than they did. they can be a member of al qaeda and can be no locally. maybe some people known them as he tribesmen another see the u.s., for instance you would see them as an al qaeda member. the u.s. thinks it's killing an al qaeda member and maybe it is. but he's been a killed on the ground and yemenis seen being killed is in fact the tribesman. this is a challenge that the u.s. obama administration not released all and i would argue that the drones in the airstrikes have not actually solve the problem and they've actually exacerbated the problem the great deal.
to draw down in afghanistan, and we have a continuing effort against al qaeda, and as we achieve some of those important goals, the united states is moving towards the end of the longest sustained armed conflict in the nation's history, and i would also like to take a moment to express my pride in the men and women in uniform who have fought throughout that period, putting their lives on line to protect this country. were it not for their sacrifices, were in not for their willingness to do that, we would not be able to accomplish what we have. thank god they are there. [applause] one thing i found out when i came from the cia to the defense department, i have a lot of great joy is. -- i have a hell of a lot of great choice. i have got great weapons, a -- i have a hell of a lot of great great ships, great plains, great toys. \ technologies, but none of that would be worth anything without the good men and women in uniform that serve this country and did it take their lives to protecting this country. that is the real strength of the united states of america. as we transition into this
-- against al qaeda is moving beyond clear combat zone. he also discusses the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff, also budget cuts to the defense department. this is an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for coming. it is an honor to be back and an honor to be introducing my old boss. as you know, secretary of the net debt is one of the most respected and experienced hands in washington. his resume is legendary. chairman of the budget committee back in the day when they actually passed a budget, director of the office of management and budget, and chief of staff to president clinton when the white house, director of the central intelligence agency, and now secretary of defense, so the question is what in the world are you going to do next. this extraordinary resume does not do justice to the man. leon panetta is a wonderful human being and in some ways a man of contrasts. i am going to give you examples. he is known among his counterparts around the world for his warm italian bear hugs. he is also known for the laser light focus he displayed on hunting down osama bin laden. he of
on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on facebook. we're hosting a conversation on twitter about this event,, hashtag ipdgc. what i will do to get as a rolling here is give a brief introduction and bio for our great panel here, and then get going into the discussion. we have a great -- with a lot of interesting people in the room. we need to leave time for discussion. first we have james glassman. executive director of the george w. bush institute. after a
the attack in benghazi the work of al-qaeda. the tiny edit they made. al-qaeda reference became act of extremism to fed in the spontaneous mob narrative, that thanks to susan rice spread like an office cold. from there, more people died. we know who pushed the video i think. now the question is >> i and will they tell us? they are trying hard not to. this is an administration suffering from wordophobia. fear of using language to accurately describe stuff. they consider fort hood massacre a workplace violence, which is calling ted bundy a bad boyfriend. video cause spontaneous upset is euphemism for what we call terror. you heard of double speak. this is triple speak to confuse the listener and hide unpleasant facts. this isn't a george orwell book and four americans are dead. why the latest example of obama speak? timing. al-qaeda attack before the election, that is like a jerk throwing up in the punch bowl. the whole obama destroying al-qaeda story becomes shakier than ikeea bookcase. so let's blame amateur video maker. in plain language it's a coverup. the president talks about ho
of drones to combat al qaeda. the rise of the terror group in yemen, and the strength of al qaeda's influence in the region and other strategies to weaken the group. from the brookings institution, this is about 90 minutes. >> good morning and welcome. my name is daniel. i'm the research director here at brookings of the saban center for middle east policy. i'm delighted that you all came out on what is such a cold and miserable day in washington. i think it shows your fortitude and the importance of what we're going to discuss today. one of the developments i would say of the last decade, perhaps a little longer, is the emergence of yemen from a country that was seen as relatively obscure and from a washington point of view at least something that was not a priority. to becoming a country that has moved from i would say the edge of the radar screen to its center. unfortunately as yemen has moved, the knowledge of yemen, i would say, among the policy community and the broader middle east community in general has not kept pace. there are relatively few people who have a strong unde
the controversial intelligence talking points the language including al-qaeda, senator said rice should have drilled down and asked more questions given her access to classified material that showed immediate and compelling evidence of the terrorist involvement. >> when you have a position that the ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in the daily preparation and responsibilities for that job. >> rice met with senator lieberman who asked whether rice was coached by the administration before her sunday show appearances. >> she said no, she was not given messaging points at all by the white house. >> in a written statement, rice who was joined by the acting c.i.a. director on the hill said, "we explain that the talking point provideed by the intelligence community and the initial assessment upon which they were based were incorrect in key respect." there was no protest or demonstration in benghazi. full week after the attack on david letterman, the president was still blaming the anti-islam video. >> extremists and terrorists use this as an excuse to attack
or at least pass on to several agencies. the line concluding that al qaeda was responsible for this act was taken out of the final version that we believe was ultimately given to the u.n. ambassador, susan rice. why was that done? who did this? catherine herridge is live on capitol hill. reporter: that's right. congressional horses tell fox news that there were changes to the cia talking points and that language of al qaeda affiliated individuals was replace -- replaced, which have the impact of minimizing or downplaying the role of al qaeda and another group, al sharia come on the consulate on 9/11. there was also testimony this week that the intelligence community to those talking points and went to an interagency process. so that other elements of the intelligence community as well as input and review by the state department, as well as the department of justice, that eventually made its way to ambassador susan rice. no one commissioner who was the final author of this talking point given to ambassador susan rice, who is on the sunday talk show on september 16 and repeated on multipl
" for al qaeda. remember, the administration said she was working from edited talking points. the question is, who did the editing? today, the senators say that acting director morell told them the fbi did. they say they later heard from the cia that he had quote, misspoken and the cia was, in fact, responsible. so what's going on here? cnn intelligence correspondent suzanne kelly has been working her sources. she's joining us now. suzanne, you just got a statement from the cia. what are they saying? >> reporter: actually, i've gotten this statement from an intelligence official who told me it was in fact the cia that made the changes which is more or less what the intelligence community has been saying from the beginning, that this was a collaborative effort within the intelligence community to get their language straight and that the reasons they were doing it had to do with, as you know, classified sources. i can read you what the u.s. intelligence official has just told me. there were literally just coming in on my phone. there were several valid intelligence and investigatory reasons
against an unusual enemy like al-qaeda. how much is cyber warfare playing into the conflict both in israel and in our confrontations with al-qaeda? >> sure. as you mentioned in your lead-in, you see cyber warfare is definitely a part of the enemy structure going after israel. there is a conventional system up now knocking down some of these missiles. israel estimates as much as 90% of the missiles have been knocked down. the u.s. for example in its fight against al-qaeda has been able to hack into the cell phones of al-qaeda leaders and leave false and misleading messages, get into al-qaeda chat rooms, and they are able to go into the cyber chat rooms and forums, and duplicate the so-called websites of these cyber terrorists. >> jennifer: and this all comes from the department of defense? >> yes, exactly. highly classified research being done. working in close cooperation with the israeli government developing cyber weapons, cyber viruses, a key but very shadowy world we're entering into. >> jennifer: so the war against al-qaeda is an unconventional far,
will have the inside story. >> the talking points from the c.i.a. specifically mentioned al-qaeda and al-qaeda was involved in the attack. when the talking points were finalized, all the references to al-qaeda were taken out. >> who changed the original talking points about the benghazi attack to take out references to al-qaeda? and why? we will investigate. >> i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do, but the folks are look for is action. >> plus, president obama and john boehner launch another effort to save the country from falling off the fiscal cliff. economists will be here to size up negotiations. caution. you are about to enter the no spin zone. "the factor" begins right now. >> hi. i'm greg gutfeld in for bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight's. let's get to our top story. general david petraeus on capitol hill testifying about libya. exactly one week after resigning as the head of the c.i.a. because of an affair, petraeus testified today in closed door hearings in front of both the house and senate intelligence committees. according to those who were th
equivalent of the rolodex negative a rolodex that tracked 500 al qaeda suicide bombers or terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just about every type of intel into searchable data weather tips or documents from the old fashioned spy network, but transcripts from interrogation, logs of surveillance, monitoring, ce llphones and computers and the images and sensory readings hovering high and silent over potential targets for days or months or years. few
. >>> to middle east experts now whether the use of drops is effective to come pat al-qaeda, both featured pammists at the brookings institution looking at the rides of the terror group in yemen. this is about an hour and a half. >>ed good -- >> good morning and welcome. i'm the research director here at brookings for middle east policy. i'm delightedded that you all came out on such a cold and miserable day in washington. that shows your fortitude and the importance of what we'll discuss today. one of the developments i would say of the last decade, perhaps a little longer is the emergence of yemen from a country that was seen as relatively obscure, and from a washington point of view, at least, something that was not a priority to becoming a country that has gone from, i'd say, the edge of the radar screen to the center. unfortunately, as yemen moved, knowledge of yes , ma'am men,ñr -- yemen, among the policy community and broadest middle east community in general has not kept pace. there's relatively few people with a strong understanding of yemen and few people who understand the dif
over the middle east . al qaeda is on the comeback. you saw in the last couple of days, fighting between the kurds ankurds and iraqi on the border. the whole mali situation where al qaeda has taken over. al qaeda training camps are in western iraq. the iranians continue, as we see, the latest i.a.e.a. report on their path towards nuclear weapons. you look at the whole middle east and it's been a significant failure north to mention our reset with the russians. . >> schieffer: let's talk a little bit about libya. you were talking a lot about that. you and the president really kind of had a little set-to last week over the situation in libya because you said once again that you would oppose the nomination of susan rice to be secretary of state. a lot of people in the administration say she is the odds-on favorite to replace hillary clinton because of her performance on television after it the benghazi attacks when she said it was the result of spontaneous demonstrations in ejim, and not-- and was not a terrorist attack. are you standing fast on that? >> well, she has a lot of expla
of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is the number one national security challenge, iran. >> for stability, the u.s. is relying on shaky morsi, member of the muslim brotherhood. two months after president said egypt is no longer an ally. morsi today but showing leadership. two days a the republican senator lindsey graham threatped to block u.s. aid to egypt. >> egypt, watch you do and how you do it. teetering with the congress to have aid cut off if you incite violence between israelis and palestinians. >> $1 billion of u.s. aid can focus the mind of morsi who today accuse israel of aggression. raising questions if he can be the broker that former president hosni mubarak was. >> shannon: ed henry at the white house. thank you, ed. get insight on the potential cease-fire agreement, michael orrin. thank you for being with us today. i want to ask about the players in the negotiations now. start with hamas hamas. reuters is saying they have put things on the table. israel has
about the al-qaeda or terrorism. no responsibility for u.s. marine guard. why put her out there in first place? the next day i checked to see where was the secretary of state or secretary of defense. head of the c.i.a. white house counter terrorism director. they were all in town. they just didn't go to testify before the five television shows. why did she do it? she was trying out for what she wanted in the second term, secretary of state. by doing it, and doing it badly, she jeopardized her chances. >> kimberly: people are digging in, saying we are not going to support her. we are going to block the appointment, the request by the president. they don't believe she is the best candidate for job. >> greg: first, welcome k.t. to the show. you have tiny shoes to fill. you don't have a dog, do you? >> no. i have a husband and five kids. >> greg: good enough. just don't talk about them. the reason president obama was angry was strange. like it's wrong to question this person. he took it personally. angry dad at parent-teacher conference. why are you bothering my student? angrier about the qu
to congressman king, petraeus told them the attack on benghazi was an act of terrorism committed by al qaeda, christopher stevens and three other americans were killed in that assault. five days after the attack on the sunday morning talk shows there was no talk of a terrorist attack from susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. she kept her talking points and blamed the deadly attack on outrage over an anti-muslim movie although she did say it was early in the days of the investigation and there was the possiblist an al qaeda group being involved in the escalation of violence, but at that point they had not been able to decide one way or the other who was involved and those talking points were first put out by the cia and went through various agencies and even the white house before ambassador rice used them on september 16th. last night on this program congressman king put the blame squarely on the white house for changing the talking points. watch. >> the intelligence community said that al qaeda was involved. that was taken out by someone in the white house. the intelligence agency sa
in libya. the white house said it never altered the cia's talking points, blaming the attack on al qaeda. former cia director petraeus told congress on friday the agency always knew that terrorism was involved. he's more. >> reporter: the mystery of who changeed the ci attacking -- on the libya attack deepens today as the white house weighs in and said no one there made the controversial changes. according to sources on capitol hill, former cia director general david petraeus told lawmakers on friday that the original cia unclassified memo said it was an al qaeda-linked terror attack. but that al qaeda part was excised in favor of a reference to extremist organizations. before, it was given to members of congress and administration officials. who made that change? the white house said that it only made one edit to the talking points, which was to call the ben ghazi site a government facility and not a consulate. white house deputy national security advisor ben rhodes told reporters today, quote, we were provided with points by the intelligence community that represented their assessment.
consulate in benghazi, libya, had been overrun by an al qaeda-sponsored militia, that destroys the thinking that al qaeda is dead, bin laden is dead. she said i want to remind the american people this president promised to go after bin laden, refocus on al qaeda. he got bin laden. al qaeda has been dismantled. and the truth of the matter nothing could have been further from the truth, and the story she told reinforced a political narrative helpful to the president. but disconnected from reality. >> let's be clear about what you're saying. you also heard senator feinstien say unequivocally that the notion that there was a cover-up or an attempt to mislead for political reasons is absolutely wrong. she says it's character assassination, the way you're criticizing her. you believe the president of the united states sent his ambassador to the u.n. out to mislead the american people so he could get some sort of political gain before the election? that's the cover-up you're c accusing them of? >> i'm saying that the ambassador that had nothing to do with benghazi -- why would you choose someone w
the computer equivalent of the roladex. it tracked 500 al-qaeda suicide bombers or terrorists who had filtered into iraq through syria, and the possession of this data base of 5 # 00 individuals who were recruitedded to blow themselves up or arrange for terrorist attacks was critical in the effort to take al-qaeda apart inside of iraq, and i'll read you what i wrote here in the prologue. the motherload of documents seized in what has become known as the sinjar raid illustrated the point nicely. the point made by lieutenant general flynn. in the six years after the 9/11 attacks, the u.s. military and intelligence communities representing a wide variety of agencies, large and small, those notorious and those secret, had been collaborating on an unprecedented capability for crushing terrorist networks. in addition to the skills of the talented special operators, the effort used super computers and custom software, forward deployment of skilled analysts, the ability to turn just about every kind of intel into searchable data whether tips or documents from old-fashioned human spy networks, transcri
kind of. -- against al qaeda. i would like to take a moment to express my pride in the men and women in uniform who have fought throughout the time putting their lives on the line to protect this country. were it not for their sacrifices, for their willingness to do that, we would not be able to accomplish what we have. thank god they are there. one thing i've found out is i have a lot of great stories of the defense department. --great toys at the defense department, but none of that would be anything without the good men and women in uniform who give their lives to protect this country. that is the real strength of the united states of america. as we transition to this new era, we will have to look at some important priorities that will take on greater urgency, particularly as we look at the second term of this administration and look at what are the challenges we are going to be confronting. this is not like the past where we come out of a period of war and the threats kind of and everyone winds up cutting out of the defense budget. this is a time where even as we come out of the
set out on his trail on a dangerous journey to an al qaeda stronghold where the effort to protect american lives is risking making even more enemies. ♪ >> reporter: if you're looking for the man u.s. officials describe as the world's most dangerous, you need to come here to the tip of arabia to a place where men wear daggers in their belts, where carts are drawn by camels and the capital is one of the oldest cities in the world. this place is yemen. ♪ >> reporter: and somewhere in this enchanted country, ibrahim asyria is hiding. he's the top bomb maker who has become the al qaeda of the arabian peninsula. the group is now the most active terrorist organization targeting the united states. >> this is an individual who dedicated his life to putting together bombs that can kill americans. >> reporter: we spoke with author gregory johnson in the old city of sunna, yemen's capital. his latest book is on al qaeda and asyri who, he says, spends his days building what asyri would consider the perfect bomb. >> it has to be strong enough to get through western security, and b, it has t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,173 (some duplicates have been removed)